The ENSO-precipitation teleconnection and its modulation by the interdecadal pacific oscillation

Westra, S. ; Renard, B. ; Thyer, M.

Type de document
Article de revue scientifique à comité de lecture
Langue
Anglais
Affiliation de l'auteur
UNIVERSITY OF ADELAIDE AUS ; IRSTEA LYON UR HHLY FRA ; UNIVERSITY OF ADELAIDE AUS
Année
2015
Résumé / Abstract
This study evaluates the role of the interdecadal Pacific oscillation (IPO) in modulating the El Niño?Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-precipitation relationship. The standard IPO index is described together with several alternatives that were derived using a low-frequency ENSO filter, demonstrating that an equivalent IPO index can be obtained as a low-frequency version of ENSO. Several statistical artifacts that arise from using a combination of raw and smoothed ENSO indices in modeling the ENSO?precipitation teleconnection are then described. These artifacts include the potentially spurious identification of low-frequency variability in a response variable resulting from the use of smoothed predictors and the potentially spurious modulation of a predictor-response relationship by the low-frequency version of the predictor under model misspecification. The role of the IPO index in modulating the ENSO?precipitation relationship is evaluated using a global gridded precipitation dataset, based on three alternative statistical models: stratified, linear, and piecewise linear. In general, the information brought by the IPO index, beyond that already contained in the Niño-3.4 index, is limited and not statistically significant. An exception is in northeastern Australia using annual precipitation data, and only for the linear model. Stratification by the IPO index induces a nonlinear ENSO?precipitation relationship, suggesting that the apparent modulation by the IPO is likely to be spurious and attributable to the combination of sample stratification and model misspecification. Caution is therefore required when using smoothed climate indices to model or explain low-frequency variability in precipitation. This study evaluates the role of the interdecadal Pacific oscillation (IPO) in modulating the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-precipitation relationship. The standard IPO index is described together with several alternatives that were derived using a low-frequency ENSO filter, demonstrating that an equivalent IPO index can be obtained as a low-frequency version of ENSO. Several statistical artifacts that arise from using a combination of raw and smoothed ENSO indices in modeling the ENSO?precipitation teleconnection are then described. These artifacts include the potentially spurious identification of low-frequency variability in a response variable resulting from the use of smoothed predictors and the potentially spurious modulation of a predictor-response relationship by the low-frequency version of the predictor under model misspecification. The role of the IPO index in modulating the ENSO?precipitation relationship is evaluated using a global gridded precipitation dataset, based on three alternative statistical models: stratified, linear, and piecewise linear. In general, the information brought by the IPO index, beyond that already contained in the Niño-3.4 index, is limited and not statistically significant. An exception is in northeastern Australia using annual precipitation data, and only for the linear model. Stratification by the IPO index induces a nonlinear ENSO-precipitation relationship, suggesting that the apparent modulation by the IPO is likely to be spurious and attributable to the combination of sample stratification and model misspecification. Caution is therefore required when using smoothed climate indices to model or explain low-frequency variability in precipitation.
Source
Journal of Climate, vol. 28, num. 12, p. 4753 - 4773

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